Easter: Our Favorite Ways to Make Easter Eggs Unique

Hippity hoppity, Easter’s on it’s way! It’s time to put up your Easter decor, plan Easter dinner and think about how you can make your Easter eggs memorable. No one will scoff at traditionally dyed eggs, but there are dozens of ways to make them a little more original. Here are a few of our favorite ways to make Easter eggs unique.

minion-eggsDecorating for Beginners You don’t have to decorate real eggs to have a belly-tickling result! These minions were created by Tidbits & Twine for a Despicable Me-themed birthday party, but we thought they were too fun not to include them in our Easter baskets! All they are, are hollow plastic eggs with the tops and bottoms mixed up in yellow and blue with googly eyes glued on and embellished with a black marker. They’re adorable and perfect for holding Easter candies.bunny-silhouettes

Cottontail Contours Speaking of markers and “easy,” Cutesy Crafts boils down egg decorating to a sticker and a few dots. It’s such a simple idea — even tiny hands can create works of art with this method. Just stick the bunny sticker on an egg and start dabbing around the edges of the sticker until you have dense constellations of dots. When the ink is dry, just peel off the sticker and you have delightful bunny silhouettes with almost no mess!  blue-marble

Little Blue Marbles Here’s a project for more mature Easter egg dyers: marbled indigo eggs. Alice and Lois did a fabulous step-by-step on how to turn plain old white eggs into marbled eggs of glory using only water and fingernail polish! As a warning, rubber gloves are suggested as this method can get quite messy.  water-color-easter-eggs

O’Keefe Ovum Here are eggs worthy of a spot on the mantle! Dream a Little Bigger made these eggs. They may take a little more time and concentration, but the result is something even Georgia O’Keefe might envy. These require a few drops of food coloring, paintbrushes and a thin black marker if you want to add the fancy outlines (but they still look cute without the outlines). This is your chance (or your kids’!) to get really creative with your eggs!  frozen-eggs

Elsa Eggs We saved the most complicated for last. A Pumpkin and a Princess came up with these eggs fit for a princess — they aredefinitely not for the crafting-faint-of-heart! Pearl paint, glitter, rhinestones and a lot of patience is what you need to create your own Frozen egg masterpiece. Though it’s a big undertaking, everyone can agree the effort put forth is worth it for all the oooooohs and awwwws.   

LTD Commodities has ideas and products to make every holiday magical! Whether you need ideas for dying awesome eggs for Easter or you’re looking for unique 4th of July decor, look to LTD to make all your holidays sparkle.

Items We Adore: Product Picks for Easter

The Easter Bunny is set to arrive a little earlier than usual this year. That means we have to start now to get ready for him! To help give you a head start we selected some of our favorite Easter products. Here are this week’s Items We Adore: Product Picks for Easter.

Peter-RabbitPeter Rabbit 10-Book Library Box Set belongs in every child’s library. The collection is filled with wonderful stories featuring Beatrix Potter’s best-loved animal characters. Each book contains a different, exciting and adorable story with a meaningful lesson. Sure to create fond memories that your child will cherish. 6-3/8″W x 7-3/4″L. Hardcover, 29 pages, each. For ages 3 and up.

easter-garlandAdd charming critters, fun patterns and vibrant colors to your home with the Welcome Spring Collection. Display appetizers, snacks and more on the Bunny Cake Plate (10-1/2″ dia. x 3-1/4″H). The Treat Jar (6-1/2″W x 10-1/4″D x 12-1/2″H) gives you quick access to a cookie or piece of candy. The Salt & Pepper Shakers (approx. 1-3/4″ x 2-1/2″ x 3-7/8″, each) are a practical addition to your dining area. Serveware and kitchenware, dolomite. All serveware and kitchenware, dishwasher safe. A Pastel Tablecloth adds beautiful colors for cheery table settings. Cotton. Machine care. Our exclusive 3-Pc. Easter Garland Set features 6 ft. of garland held on either side by 2 sand-weighted polyester bunnies (approx. 11-3/8″H, each). Add a pop of color to your walls the Bunny Ribbon Wreath (13-1/2″W x 24″L) with its wire frame that easily folds for storage. Polyester and metal. Ready to hang. All fabric items, imported.

mesh-bunnyCelebrate the Easter season with a Lighted Geo Mesh Bunny or Chick. It features 15 white lights intertwined in the mesh that makes up its glittered body. Requires 3 “AA” batteries. Our exclusive Bunny, 20″ x 12″ x 3″. Chick, 18-1/2″ x 16″ x 3″. Polyester, foam and metal. Comes ready to hang.

seedballzNo digging or tilling required! Just place each Drop & Grow SeedBallz in the soil. Loaded with seeds, each ball grows clusters of flowers. Do not bury deep; keep moist. Store SeedBallz in a dry, cool place. Each set comes with 8 SeedBallz. They are hand-rolled by individuals with developmental disabilities in the USA. Grow flowers easily in the garden or containers with these “truffle-like” clay balls.

garden-flagsUpdate your outdoor or indoor garden decor throughout the year with the 13-Pc. Monthly Flag Set. This festive set features a flag for each month with lovely artwork and a cheerful greeting. It’s the perfect size to accent any potted or low-growing plant. Polyester and metal.

Tooth Fairy Day: A Brief History of the Tooth Fairy

tooth-fairy-pillowWith the kids going back to school, taking on new responsibilities and learning new traditions, it’s fitting that August 22 is Tooth Fairy Day. The fictional sprite symbolizes a rite of passage for kids as they grow, learn and evolve, much the way the Tooth Fairy has done over the last century or so. Here’s a little bit about the Tooth Fairy and how she became the unofficial patron saint of lost teeth.  

Cultural Conventions Like many symbols Americans use for holidays and rituals (Santa Claus, the Easter Bunny, trick-or-treating), the Tooth Fairy is a blend of ideas and symbols we borrowed from Europeans and other cultures. For most cultures, losing a baby tooth is a stepping stone toward adulthood and so giving children money in exchange for teeth is thought to be the first introduction to responsibility. In Scandinavian countries parents give children money when they lose their first tooth, but no fairies are involved in the exchange. In some places, children throw their teeth at the sun or on a rooftop as a way to request a new, strong tooth, but money and supernatural creatures aren’t part of this ceremony.missing-teeth

Rodents In Spain and other hispanic cultures, children put their newly lost teeth under their pillows for Ratoncito Perez — a mouse who takes the tooth and replaces it with a small gift. In French-speaking countries, a mouse is also given the responsibility of a tooth exchange. Some people believe this idea is traced to Marie-Catherine Baronne d’Aulnoy who wrote The Good Little Mouse in the 17th century. It’s about a fairy who morphs into a mouse to help a queen held captive by an evil king. However, contrary to what people say (a popular summary of the story is the mouse hid under the evil king’s pillow so she could knock out his teeth, which is false) there isn’t a lot in the way of baby teeth and pillows to link it to the Tooth Fairy. There are also theories that children surrender their teeth to the “tooth mouse” so their teeth grow in as strong as a rodent’s or teeth that keep growing because rodents grow until they die.

missing-teeth2American as… The Tooth Fairy The Tooth Fairy as Americans know her today, came to life as early as the 1900s with a combination of characteristics from European folklore. The Tooth Fairy was first mentioned in the Chicago Daily Tribune in 1908, but she didn’t find a firm place in literature until 1927. Esther Watkins Arnold wrote a play called The Tooth Fairy (though it’s likely not an origin story) and in 1949, Lee Rogo wrote a short story published in Collier’s about new parents and the mythical creature their daughter believed in — but there’s no explanation on where this fairy came from.

The origins of the Tooth Fairy are murky at best and they aren’t as interesting or fun as Santa Claus and the Easter Bunny, but it’s a tradition parents love to hold up, year after year and generation after generation — and kids are almost always willing to take cash for a missing tooth.

Keep your traditions alive with LTD Commodities! From birthday celebrations to Thanksgiving dinners, make your custom special with products priced for fun from LTD.